eklogai

polytheist extractions

Theodoret, Ecclesiastical History 5.21

“The Prefect of the East attempted to destroy the huge and richly decorated temple of Zeus, but found that the building was firm and solid and that it was beyond the power of man to break up its closely compacted stones, for they were immense and well and truly laid, and moreover clamped fast with iron and lead. When the divine Marcellus saw the Prefect’s timidity he sent him on to the rest of towns while he himself began to pray fervently for the destruction of the temple. Next morning there came uninvited to the bishop a man who was no builder or mason or artificer of any sort, but only a simple laborer who carried stone and timber on his shoulders. The laborer begged the bishop to be given the chance to destroy the temple and Marcellus gave him everything that he requested for the job. Round the four sides of the temple went a portico united to it and on which its upper story rested. The columns were of great bulk, commensurate with the temple, each being sixteen cubits in circumference. The quality of the stone was exceptionally hard, offering great resistance to the mason’s tools. In each of these the man dug through its entire diameter, propping up the superstructure with olive timber before he went on to another. After he had hollowed out three of the columns, he set fire to the timbers. But a black demon appeared and would not suffer the wood to be consumed, as it naturally would be, by the fire, and stayed the force of the flame. After the attempt had been made several times and the plan was proved ineffectual, news of the failure was brought to the bishop, who was taking a nap. Marcellus forthwith hurried to the church and began to beseech the lord not to give in to the usurping power of the demon but to lay bare its weakness and exhibit his own strength, lest unbelievers should henceforth find excuse for greater wrong. At this the demon fled and the wood immediately caught fire and began to burn. When their support had vanished the columns themselves fell down and dragged twelve others with them. The side of the temple which was connected with the columns was dragged down by violence of their fall and carried away with them. The crash, which was tremendous, was heard throughout the town, and all ran to see the sight.” – Theodoret, Ecclesiastical History 5.21

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: