eklogai

polytheist extractions

The Council of Turin 23

“Returning to their own houses after mass, they return to the errors of the Pagans; having received the body of the lord they accept food sacrificed to demons. We urge pastors as well as priests to take care that on holy authority they drive out of the church those whom they notice persisting in this folly or doing things contrary to the teachings of the church at heaven knows what rocks, trees or springs, the chosen places of Pagans, and that they do not allow those who keep Pagan customs to participate in the sacrament of the altar.” – The Council of Turin 23

Ghärbald of Lüttich, Capitulary 2.10

“Let lot-casters and fortune-tellers be sought out, as well as those who observe the months and favorable moments and who observe dreams, and the people who carry around their necks those amulets which are inscribed with who knows what kind of words and veneficae, that is women who administer different potions in order to abort a pregnancy and who perform certain divinations so that they will be loved the better by their husbands as a result. Have all malefici, of whatever they be accused, brought in front of us so that their cases may be heard by us.” – Ghärbald of Lüttich, Capitulary 2.10

Maximus of Turin, Sermon 63.1

“How can you who have accepted the holy eucharist then celebrate a banquet of superstition during the Kalends of January? Befuddling the mind with wine, distending the belly with food, twisting the limbs in dances and engaging in depraved acts so that you are forced to forget what are the things that belong to god and instead pay dues to an idol – this is not what Christians do, but rather Pagans!” – Maximus of Turin, Sermon 63.1

Maximus of Turin, Sermon 98.1

“What sensible person who understands the sacraments of the lord’s birth does not condemn the Saturnalia nor reject the lechery of the Kalends? For there are many who still carry on with the superstitious old customs of the foolishness of the Kalends. They celebrate this day as the highest feast. Where they look thus for happiness they find, rather, sorrow. They wallow in wine and sicken themselves on feasting so that he who is chaste and moderate all year gets drunk and pollutes himself; and if he does not do so, he thinks that he has been deprives of the feast.” – Maximus of Turin, Sermon 98.1

Pacianus of Barcelona, Parenesis 1.13

“Unhappy me! What wickedness did I let loose! I think they would not have known how to play the Little Stag on the Kalends had I not by my rebuke shown them how.” – Pacianus of Barcelona, Parenesis 1.13

Caesarius of Arles, Sermon 193.1-3

“I rebuke the demented customs of those who for the sake of foolish gaiety observe the Kalends of January or the folly of other superstitions which men think give them license to get drunk and indulge in obscene chanting and games. Worse still is the indecent flaunting of men in women’s clothing and make-up grotesque enough to make the demons themselves blanch. They sing bawdy songs in praise of vice, sung with shameless gusto and accompanied by disjointed gestures and mumming in the likeness of she-goats and stags. The inventor of evil makes his entry through these in order to master souls ensnared by the appearance of play. I call upon the sober and upright members of this congregation to reprimand your neighbors and subordinates, to forbid them to use indecent language or sing those bawdy songs, and especially to deny alms to those who by sacrilegious custom are carried away by insanity rather than playfulness. And unless you want to share in their guilt I tell you: do not allow a little stag or a little yearling or monstrosities of any other sort to appear before your houses, but rather chastise and punish them and, if you can, even tie them up tightly. Admonish your household not to follow the sacrilegious customs of the unhappy Pagans.” – Caesarius of Arles, Sermon 193.1-3

Caesarius of Arles, Sermon 192.24

“During the Kalends of January wretched men, and worse yet, even some who are baptized, don false appearances, monstrous disguises, in which I know not whether they are primarily laughingstocks or rather objects of sorrow. What sensible person indeed could believe that he would find sane people who deliberately transform themselves into the state of wild beasts while playing the stag. Some are clothed in the hide of beasts, others don animal headdresses, rejoicing and exulting if thus they have changed themselves into the likeness of beasts so as not to appear to be men. Now truly, what is this! How vile! That those who are born men dress in women’s clothing and, by the vilest of perversion, sap their manly strength to resemble girls, not blushing to clothe their soldier’s muscles in women’s gowns: they flaunt their bearded faces, and they aim to look just like women. There are those who observe omens during the Kalends of January by refusing to give fire from their house or any other goods to anyone, no matter who asks; yet they accept diabolical gifts from others and give them to others themselves. That night, moreover, some rustics arrange little tables with the many things necessary for eating; they intend that the tables remain arranged like this throughout the night, for they believe that the Kalends of January can do this for them, that throughout the entire year they will continue to hold their feasts amid plenty. I command your household to get rid of these and other practices like them, which would take too long to describe, which are thought by ignorant people to be trifling sins, or none at all; and command your household to observe the Kalends as they do the Kalends of other months. And therefore the saintly fathers of ancient days, considering how most of mankind spent those days in gluttony and lechery, going mad with drunkenness and sacrilegious dancing, ordained throughout the whole world that all the churches should proclaim a public fast, so that wretched men might know that the evil that they brought upon themselves was so great that all the churches are obliged to fast for their sins. In fact, let no one doubt that anyone who shows any kindness to foolish men who lewdly indulging in amusements during those Kalends is himself a sharer of their sins.” – Caesarius of Arles, Sermon 192.24

Isidore of Seville, Etymologie 2.11.1.140

“Menstrual blood is very dangerous, especially when used in harmful magic. Because of it plants fail to germinate, must turns sour, grass dies, trees drop their fruit, rust eats iron, bronze turns black. If dogs eat of it they get rabies. Asphalt, which resists both iron and water, crumbles immediately when polluted by that gore.” – Isidore of Seville, Etymologie 2.11.1.140

Isidore of Seville, Etymologie 8.9.11

“Necromancers are those by whose spells the dead appear to be raised in order to prophesy and to answer questions, for corpse is nekros in Greek and divination mantia. Blood is thrown on a corpse to raise the dead because demons are said to love blood. Therefore whenever necromancy is practiced blood is mixed with water to obtain more easily the color of blood.” – Isidore of Seville, Etymologie 8.9.11

St. Jerome, as quoted in Collectio Hibernensis 49.13-14

“Some believe that the souls of the dead can see other things that happen, not merely the present but the past and future as well, when it is needful either for them or for us. But the truth is that not all the dead can see what happens here, just as not everyone, except for prophets, foresees all things in this world.” – St. Jerome, as quoted in Collectio Hibernensis 49.13-14

Homilia de sacrilegiis 5

“And whoever consults seers or seeresses, that is pythonesses, through whom devils make reply, who goes to question them and believes what they say, or goes to listen to them attentively in order to hear anything from demons – he is not Christian but a Pagan.” – Homilia de sacrilegiis 5

Capitula Vesulensia 22

“Dances and leapings and circuses and vile, lewd songs and diabolical pranks are not to be performed either in the roads or houses or in any other place because they are left over from Pagan custom.” – Capitula Vesulensia 22

St. Eligius, MGH SRM 4.705

“Let no one perform solstice rites nor dances, leapings or devilish songs on the Feast of St. John the Baptist or some other solemnity of the saints.” – St. Eligius, MGH SRM 4.705

Caesarius of Arles, Sermon 54.6

“There are those who from naivety or ignorance or surely – which is more believable – from greed, neither feared nor blushed to eat of sacrifices or of sacrilegious food prepared in the Pagan fashion. True Christians, however, ought to avoid the devilish banquets held in the vicinity of a shrine or springs or of particular trees. And even if you keep yourself away from the diabolical feast, that is not enough, for there are some who eat the food that others prepare and bring home from the shrines, which is completely unacceptable.” – Caesarius of Arles, Sermon 54.6

Pseudo-Gregory, Penitential 27.183-4

“In my opinion, to sacrifice to demons in machinis is to believe in their extremely foul illusions, or to make use of divinatory science through what is called false lots of the saints, or spells, symbols or whatever kind of pendants or bindings, in all of which is the skill of demons, coming from the pestiferous union of men and wicked angels.” – Pseudo-Gregory, Penitential 27.183-4

Charlemagne, Concilia 2.1.1-4

“We have decreed that each bishop, with the help of the gravio, who is the defender of the Church, should take care according to the canons that the people of god in his diocese do not perform Pagan acts but cast off and spurn every filth of Paganism, and that they should forbid sacrifices of the dead or sorcerers or soothsayers or amulets or omens or enchantments or the sacrificial victims which stupid men honor in the name of the blessed martyrs or confessors in the vicinity of churches, provoking god and his saints to anger, or those sacrilegious fires which they call nied fyr, and all those who love Pagan observances.” – Charlemagne, Concilia 2.1.1-4

The Council of Toledo 12.11.398-9

“We admonish all those who worship idols, venerate stones, light torches and honor sacred springs or trees, that they should know that they who are seen to sacrifice to the devil subject themselves to death. And, accordingly, as soon as the priests and civil authorities discover such things they are to devote themselves to uprooting the sacrilegious idolatry and all that is against the holy faith, which foolish men, entrapped by diabolic cults, devote themselves to. These are to be removed and destroyed. Moreover they are to restrain with blows those who assemble for such vileness and hand them over, loaded down with iron, to their masters if, at least, their masters promise under oath to guard them so vigilantly that they will be unable to further practice such wickedness. If their masters are unwilling to keep the guilty persons of this sort in their charge, they are then to be brought before the king by those who had punished them, so that the prince’s authority may exercise its free power to dispose of them. Nevertheless, let their masters, who have delayed in punishing the proclaimed faults of such slaves, be subject to the sentence of excommunication: let them also be aware that they have lost their power over the slave whom they refused to correct. If free-born persons are implicated in these faults, they are both to suffer the sentence of perpetual excommunication and to be punished with a particularly stringent exile.” – The Council of Toledo 12.11.398-9

The Council of Toledo 16.129-30

“We declare that bishops and judges together are to destroy idols and that masters are to forbid their slaves to practice idolatry. Since the sacrilege of idolatry has developed throughout almost all of Span and Gaul, the holy synod has decreed with the consent of the most glorious prince that every priest, together with the district judge, is to examine carefully the sacrilege reported in his region, and to expel any that they find without delay. Moreover, they are to use force on all those implicated in such error by whatever punitive measures they can, up to a penalty of death. If they fail to do this, both should know that they are subject to the danger of excommunication. Moreover if any masters fail to uproot this evil from their estates and are unwilling to prohibit their households, they are to be banished by the bishop from the communion of the faithful.” – The Council of Toledo 16.129-30

Caesarius of Arles, Sermon 53.1

“If, dearly beloved, we rejoice indeed because we see you hasten faithfully to church, we are saddened and grieved because we know that some of you go off even more often to the ancient worship of idols, like godless Pagans who lack the grace of baptism. We have heard that some of you pay your vows to trees, pray to springs and commit acts unmentionable. In fact there are unhappy wretches who not only do not want to destroy the shrines of Pagans but even do no fear nor blush to rebuild what was destroyed. And if someone who is mindful of god wants to burn sacred trees or scatter and destroy diabolical altars, they go mad with rage and are overcome by great frenzy, so that they even dare to strike those who tried to overturn the sacrilegious idols for the love of god … And why do such wretches bother to come to church or accept the sacrament of baptism if afterwards they are to return to the sacrilege of idols?” – Caesarius of Arles, Sermon 53.1

Letter of Pope Gregory to King Ethelbert in Bede HE 1.32.12

“Do not follow the cult of idols; overturn the sanctuaries used as shrines and edify your subjects by the great purity of your life and by exhortation, threats, persuasion, chastisement and good example.” – Letter of Pope Gregory to King Ethelbert in Bede HE 1.32.12

Ratio de catichizandis rudibus 81, 82

“Do not pay honor to idols, do not use charms, do not read omens, do not make sacrifices to mountains, nor trees, nor at the corners of foundation stones. Foolish, faithless and wretched men make idols for themselves with their own hands. They cast and sculpt gods for themselves in the image of man, some from gold, some from silver, some from bronze. Then they set them up and adore them. But others make themselves gods from wood and stone. Others still adore animals and worship them as gods. They give these idols the names of men who died badly in the midst of vices and sins, and whose souls now suffer eternal torments.” – Ratio de catichizandis rudibus 81, 82

St. Columban, Penitential 24.104-5

“But if any layman ate or drank in the vicinity of shrines out of ignorance, let him promise immediately never to do so again, and let him repent for forty days on bread and water; if, however, he did it for contempt after a priest preached to him that this was sacrilege, and he communed afterwards at the table of demons, and if he did it or repeated it only because of the vice of gluttony, let him repent for three quadragesimae on bread and water; if, in fact, he did this as a cult of demons or in honor of idols, let him do penance for three years.” – St. Columban, Penitential 24.104-5

The Edict of King Childebert, 1.2-3

“Because it is necessary that our authority be used to correct the common people who do not observe the priests’ teaching as they should, we order that this charter be sent out generally into every locality, commanding that those persons who were warned about their land and other places where statues were put up or man-made idols dedicated to a demon, and who did not immediately cast them down, or who forbade the priests from destroying them, should be arrested and brought into our presence for trial … A report has reached us that many sacrileges occur among the population whereby god is injured and the people sink down into death through sin: night watches spent in drunkenness, obscenity and song even on the holy days of Easter, the Nativity and other feasts, with dancing women promenading through the villages. In no way do we permit the performance of any of these deeds which injure god. We command that whoever dares to perpetuate these sacrileges after having been warned by the priest and our edict shall receive an hundred lashes – unless he be a freedman or of higher status.” The Edict of King Childebert, 1.2-3

Burchard of Worms, Decretum 19.5.103

“Did you make little children’s bows and children’s shoes and throw them into your pantry or storehouse for the satyri and pilosi [“hairy ones”] to play with, so that they would bring you other people’s goods and enrich you as a result?” – Burchard of Worms, Decretum 19.5.103

Regino of Prüm, De synodalibus causis 2.371

“Certain criminal women, who have turned back to Satan and are seduced by the illusions of demons and by phantasms, believe and avow openly that during the night hours they ride on certain beasts together with Diana, the goddess of the Pagans, and an uncounted host of women; that they pass over many lands in the silence of the dead of night; that they obey her orders as those of a mistress; and that on certain nights they are summoned to her service. If only these sorceresses could die in their impiety without dragging many others into their loss. Fooled into error, many people believe that these rides of Diana really exist. Thus they leave the true faith and fall into Pagan error in believing that a god or goddess can exist besides the only true god.” – Regino of Prüm, De synodalibus causis 2.371

John of Ephesos as quoted in the third book of the Chronicle of Zuqnin

“In the nineteenth year of the Emperor Justinian, they were busy, thanks to my zeal, with the matter of the Pagans who were discovered in Constantinople. These were illustrious and noble men, with a host of grammarians, sophists, scholastics and physicians. When they were discovered and, thanks to torture, denounced themselves, they were seized, flogged, imprisoned, and sent to the churches so that they might learn the Christian faith as was appropriate for Pagans. There were among them patricians and nobles. Then a powerful and wealthy Pagan named Phocas, who was a patrician, saw the harshness of the inquisition and knowing that those arrested had denounced him as a Pagan, and that a severe sentence had been given against him because of the zeal of the emperor, that night took deadly poison and so left this earthly life. When the emperor heard this, he ordered with justice that he should be interred like an ass, that there should be no cortege or prayer for him. So his family during the night put him on a litter, carried him, made an open grave and threw him in it like a dead animal. Thanks to this the Pagans were afraid for some time. Later on the goodness of god visited Asia, Caria, Lydia and Phrygia, thanks to the zeal of the victorious Justinian and by the efforts of his humble servant. So by the power of the holy spirit, 70,000 souls were instructed, and left behind the errors of Paganism, the worship of idols and the temples of the demons for the knowledge of the truth. All were converted, disavowed the errors of their ancestors, were baptized in the name of our lord Jesus Christ, and were added to the number of Christians. The victorious Justinian paid the expenses and clothing for baptism; he also took care to give three gold pieces to each of them. When god had opened their minds and had made known the truth, they helped us with their own hands to destroy their temples, to overthrow their idols, to extirpate the sacrifices that were offered everywhere, to cut down their altars, soiled with the blood of sacrifices offered to demons, and to cut down countless trees that they worshipped because they were leaving all the errors of their ancestors. The salutary sign of the cross was planted everywhere among them, and churches of god were founded everywhere. They were built and erected, to the number of eighty-six, with great diligence and zeal, in the high mountains and steep and in the plains, in all the places where there was Paganism. Twelve monasteries were also founded in places which were Pagan, and where the name of Christian name had never been heard from the beginning of the world until this time. Fifty-five churches were founded at public expense and forty-one at the expense of the new Christians. The victorious emperor gave them willingly, by our hands, the sacred vessels, clothes, books and brass items.” – John of Ephesos as quoted in the third book of the Chronicle of Zuqnin

St. Eligius, MGH SRM 4.706-07

“We abjure those who believe in or invoke the names of foul demons such as Neptune, Orcus, Diana, Minerva, the Genius and all such similar nonsense. Furthermore let no woman dare to name Minerva or other ill-omened personages while weaving or dyeing or doing any other work.” – St. Eligius, MGH SRM 4.706-07

Pope Zacharias, Epistle 80

“You must rebaptize those who have been christened by sacrilegious priests, I mean those who while professing Christ also immolate oxen and goats to the gods of the Pagans, eat the flesh and hold sacrifices to the dead.” – Pope Zacharias, Epistle 80

Martin of Braga, De correctione rusticorum 18

“It is bad and vile that those who are Pagan and unacquainted with the Christian religion honor Jupiter’s day or some other demon’s and abstain from work.” – Martin of Braga, De correctione rusticorum 18

Charlemagne, Admonitio Generalis 65

“Let no one be found among you who accepts arioli and observes dreams and omens, nor one who is a sorcerer or enchanter nor one who consults a pythoness.” – Charlemagne, Admonitio Generalis 65