eklogai

polytheist extractions

Tag Archives: gervase

Gervase of Tilbury, Otia Imperialia 3.103

“In the Rhône stands the castle of Roquemaure. On the estate of this castle there are vines which the people call brumestae, producing good fat grapes. These vines flower and produce clusters of grapes as ordinary vines do, but then they cheat their husbandman’s expectation: for when it comes to the feast of St. John the Baptist, all the fruit vanishes, and nothing which might even grow into fruit is found on them.” – Gervase of Tilbury, Otia Imperialia 3.103

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Gervase of Tilbury, Otia Imperialia 3.86

“Yet the same infallible scripture testifies, as Augustine points out, that angels have appeared in bodies of such kind that they could not only be seen but also touched. And there is, too, a widespread folk-belief in a phenomenon which many people have experienced themselves, or have heard reliably described by others with first-hand experience, whose word is trustworthy: these people claim to have seen Silvani and Panes which are the creatures that people call incubi; the French word for them is duses. I do not presume to make a definitive statement on this basis as to whether some spirits with bodies made from the element of air can arouse or experience lust, so that somehow or other they mate with women or undergo the like from men. But certainly, even this element is perceived by the bodily sensation of touch when a fan is set in motion. But here is something that we do know, from reputable sources: many men become the lovers of larvas of this kind, which they call fays and when they have transferred their affections with a view to marrying other women, they have died before they could enjoy carnal union with their new partners. And we have seen many men who had attained the summit of worldly happiness, but then, as soon as they renounced the embraces of fays of this kind, or spoke about them in public, they lost not only their worldly prosperity, but even the solace of a wretched life.” – Gervase of Tilbury, Otia Imperialia 3.86

Gervase of Tilbury, Otia Imperialia 3.60

“Here is another thing, no less wonderful and quite widely known, which happened in Great Britain. There was a hunting-forest in Gloucestershire teeming with boars, stags, and every kind of game commonly found in England. In a leafy glade of this forest was a hillock, which rose to a man’s height at its highest point. Knights and other hunters used to climb up on top of the hillock whenever, worn out with heat and thirst, they sought some relief from their discomfort. Now given the right combination of place and circumstances, if anyone strayed a long way from his companions and climbed it alone and then, though alone, said ‘I’m thirsty’ as if he were speaking to someone else, at once, to his surprise, there would be a cupbearer standing at his side, in rich attire, with a merry face, and holding in his outstretched hand a large horn, adorned with gold and jewels, such as is used by the old English as a drinking-vessel. Some nectar of an unfamiliar but delicious taste would be offered him. When he had drunk it, all the heat and weariness of his sweating body would leave him, so that anyone would believe, not that he had just been engaged in action, but that he was eager to start. When he had consumed the nectar, the server would provide him with a napkin with which to wipe his lips; and then, his ministration completed, he would disappear without waiting for a reward for his services or for conversation to satisfy curiosity.” – Gervase of Tilbury, Otia Imperialia 3.60

Gervase of Tilbury, Otia Imperialia 3.43

“Also in the kingdom of Arles, in the province of Aix, they say that there is a crag on whose steep face, which is like a wall pierced with windows, two or more ladies appear to travelers when they are a long way away, conversing with each other, as they pretend, and clapping their hands at a shared joke. These women seem beautiful, charming and alluring to people at a distance, but when they come closer the vision utterly vanishes into illusion.” – Gervase of Tilbury, Otia Imperialia 3.43